Progressive Era Web Quest

 

 Introduction

Progressives and Reformers [1901-1921]:

A period of reform known as the Progressive Era took shape in the late 1800's. During this time, Americans worked to fight corruption in government, reduce the power of big business, and improve society. Government became more democratic as people in many states gained the power to pass laws directly.

After years of effort, American women finally won the right to vote. African Americans and other minorities also took action against discrimination during the Progressive Era. In spite of many setbacks, they laid the groundwork for future progress in civil rights.

In today’s world, we see reminants of the Progressive Era in almost every facet of society. For example, women’s rights groups are still in effect, newspapers attempt to uncover political corruption in almost every level of government, and organizations such as MADD and SADD lobby for the enactment of legislation that will limit drunk driving.

The Progressive Era has had a lasting impact on American society.


 

 

The Quest

Reformers addressed many issues during the Progressive Era [1901-1921], including, but not limited to, women's rights, the emergence of inner city slums, equality for African Americans, and alcohol abuse within families.

 

Of the many reform movements addressed during the Progressive Era, which movement had the most positive, lasting impact on society to this day? What evidence exists in today's society to support your opinion?


 

 

The Process and Resources

In this WebQuest you will be working together with a group of students in class. This will be called your team. Each member of your team will be responsible for researching the following topics:

-The Women's Rights Movement
-Muckrakers
-The Fight for Equality
-Prohibition


There are specific tasks that must be completed by each team member. After that team member has completed his/her tasks, the group members will come together to discuss/debate the following essential questions:

**Of the many reform movements occurring during the Progressive Era, which reform movement had the most positive, lasting impact on society to this day?

**What evidence exists in today's society to support your opinion?

**Who were the key personalities related to this movement? 
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You'll begin with everyone in your group getting some background information before dividing into roles where people on your team become experts on one part of the topic:

 

 

 Phase 1 - Background: Something for Everyone

 

In this phase, look at the links below and combine it with our classroom discussion to get a general overview of the period. This is to give you some information on the Progressive Era and to ensure that each of you begins this quest with the same amount of background knowledge.

 

 

 Phase 2 - Looking at the Movements

 

The Women's Rights Movement

The struggle for women's rights goes back many years. Prior to the American Civil War, women began to organize protests, marches, and conventions in an attempt to promote women's rights. At the turn of the century, women made some progress for their cause but many Americans were still unprepared to recognize women as equals.

Use the Internet information linked below to complete these tasks specifically related to The Women's Rights Movement:

1. Use one of the linked websites to examine the issues that women faced in the 20th century (1900's). Find one issue and write a brief summary of it that includes: a. an identification of the issue, b. how women wanted the issue resolved by the government/society, and c. what actions women undertook to become agents of change.

2. Create a timeline listing 10 [ten] historic events or people related to women's rights. Be sure to keep each event or person in chronological order. For each item write a brief summary (2-3 sentences) that elaborates on the significance of the event or person.

3. Find a political cartoon related to the Women's Rights Movement. Write a paragraph analysis of this image. 

 

  • Women's Influence- Explains how women claimed more public and leadership roles for themselves during the Progressive Era.
  • Suffrage- An introduction to the issues and arguments for and against suffrage.
  • Women's Movement Timeline- A timeline of key events in the Women's Rights Movement (1848-1994).
  • Women in the Progressive Era - Focuses on the contributions of women to the American Progressive Movement and women's suffrage in particular.
  • Votes for Women: Suffrage Pictures and Cartoons - Find political cartoons that focus on the Women's Rights Movement. To use: click on SEARCH by Keyword, type cartoon in the search box and click on SEARCH, click on the title of the cartoon you want to view, click on the cartoon to enlarge it.
  • Woman's Sphere Cartoon - Find a political cartoon focused on the Women's Rights Movement.
  • Woman Suffrage in Political Cartoons - View political cartoons related to the suffrage movement.

 

Muckrakers: Exposing the Ills of Society

To bring about change, reformers first had to ignite public anger. A major weapon was the Press. Newspaper reporters visited the slums and described the horrible conditions that existed there. They photographed shocking images of slum life. They wrote novels revealing gruesome details of the meatpacking industry. Muckrakers worked to change public opinion with the hope that the public would force the government to take action against the ills of society.

Use the Internet information linked below to complete these tasks specifically related to Muckrakers: Exposing the Ills of Society:

1. Write down all of the issues that Muckrakers were exposing and that government needed to address in the early 1900's.  Also, include any key personalities, "rags" or events related to this.

2. Using the links below as your guide, write a brief paragraph that a. identifies an issue he Muckrakers addressed; b. describes how public interest groups currently think the issue should be resolved; c. describes how the public interest groups will attempt to bring about change with regard to this issue.

3. Find a political cartoon related to the Muckrakers. Write a paragraph analysis of this image. 

 

 

The Fight for Equality

After the end of Reconstruction, African Americans in the South lost their own hard won political rights through Jim Crow laws. These laws led to segregation in schools, on trains, and in other public places.

In the 1880's, life became progressively worse for African-Americans. The Depression of 1893 caused many people to lose their jobs. Consequently, in some areas (mainly the South), unemployed whites took their anger out on blacks. In the 1890's, white lynch mobs were responsible for the murders of more than 1,000 blacks.

Use the Internet information linked below to complete these tasks specifically related to The Fight for Equality.

1. Write a 1 to 2 paragraph summary comparing Booker T. Washington's views on equality to those of W.E.B. Du Bois. 

2. Using the NAACP timeline, create a timeline of major events and people over the last 100 years that were instrumental to the Civil Rights Movement.

3. Find a political cartoon related to The Fight for Equality. Write a paragraph analysis of this image. 

  • National Civil Rights Museum - The 'INTERACTIVE TOUR' highlights the Civil Rights Movement from its beginning until the present, with information on Booker T. Washington and W.E.B. Du Bois.
  • Booker T. Washington and W.E.B. Du Bois - Read about how W.E.B. Du Bois and Booker T. Washington disagreed on strategies for black progress.
  • W.E.B. Du Bois - Read about W.E.B. Du Bois and his views on Booker T. Washington's leadership in the fight for equality.
  • The African American Experience in Ohio- political cartoons - Access political cartoons by clicking on this link. Find 'SEARCH for KEYWORD' and click on this. In the search box type in 'political cartoons,' click SEARCH and then browse throught the collection offered.
  • NAACP Timeline - A timeline tracking the NAACP's role in the fight for equality.  Note:  The NAACP is also a product of the progressive movement.

 

Prohibition: The Temperance Movement

The Temperance Movement was formed in opposition to the consumption of alcoholic beverages. It began in the early 1800's. By the end of that century, the Temperance Movement was gaining strength. Women, in particular, recognized alcohol as a threat to their families. Drinking was a frequent cause of violence and added to economic hardships within the home. As our nation grew in population and cities swelled with impoverished people, alcohol surfaced as the root of society's evils. Before long, political leaders would be pressured to debate the prohibition of alcohol in the country.

Use the Internet information linked below to complete these tasks specifically related to Prohibition-The Temperance Movement:

1. Which people and events were instrumental to the enactment of prohibition. Explain why this was such an important issue to people involved.  Write a 1-2 Paragraph summary outlining these aspects of the movement.

2.  Create a timeline for the Temperance Movement.

3. Find and print up a political cartoon related to Prohibition and the Temperance Movement. Write a paragraph analysis of this image. 

 

 Phase 3 - Debating, Discussing, and Reaching Consensus

This phase of the quest will be done in the classroom.  You will be given a rubric as well as an outline of the rules for this debate.

 

As a group, you should discuss and debate our essential question:
'Of the many reform movements occurring during the Progressive Era, which type of reform movement had the most positive, lasting impact on society to this day?'

 

and

'What evidence exists in today's society to support your opinion?'

Each of you will bring a certain viewpoint to the answer: some of you will agree and others disagree. Use information gathered from your completed tasks to convince your teammates that your viewpoint is important and should be part of your team's answer to the Question. Your WebQuest team should come to a conclusion that everyone on the team can live with.

 

 

Source:  http://www.somers.k12.ct.us/~pgoduti/progressive_erawebq.htm